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Archive for the ‘Gatekeeper’ tag

Guru Guide: CVOICE (IOS Gateways)

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I have a confession to make: I love gateways and gatekeepers. There’s something about diving into the command line that appeals to my personality. The black of the terminal… The blinking white cursor…

Truth be told, I didn’t always enjoy gateways. They were difficult to wrap my head around at first, but now they’re a piece of cake. I used to enjoy MGCP gateways for the ease of configuration, but now H.323 is my preferred method. Yes, there is a great deal more configuration when running H.323 or SIP, but you have much more control.

And control is something we engineers like to have (and keep)!

If you’re studying for the CVOICE lab or just generally interested in a concise reference on basic commands and theory surrounding gateways and gatekeepers, refer to this “Guru Guide” below. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Matthew Berry

January 16th, 2011 at 1:27 pm

Debug RAS

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HQ-RTR#debug ras
H.323 RAS Messages debugging is on
HQ-RTR#
STEP ONE: ARQ received from BR2 gateway“I’m dumb.  Does this guy exist and can I talk to him?  Gatekeeper, help me.”
May 12 15:17:12.357:  RecvUDP_IPSockData  successfully rcvd message of length 200 from 10.10.112.2:50555
May 12 15:17:12.357: ARQ (seq# 1989) rcvdparse_arq_nonstd: ARQ Nonstd decode succeeded, remlen = 1134656188
STEP TWO: ACF sent to BR2 gateway
May 12 15:17:12.361:  IPSOCK_RAS_sendto:   msg length 86 from 10.10.110.1:1719 to 10.10.202.1: 50555
May 12 15:17:12.361:       RASLib::RASSendACF: ACF (seq# 1989) sent to 10.10.202.1
STEP THREE: ARQ from CUCM trunk
May 12 15:17:12.381:  RecvUDP_IPSockData  successfully rcvd message of length 110 from 10.10.210.11:32804
May 12 15:17:12.385: ARQ (seq# 3846) rcvd
STEP FOUR: ACF sent to CUCM trunk - “Yes, moron, you can talk to this gateway.”
May 12 15:17:12.385:  IPSOCK_RAS_sendto:   msg length 24 from 10.10.110.1:1719 to 10.10.210.11: 32804
May 12 15:17:12.385:       RASLib::RASSendACF: ACF (seq# 3846) sent to 10.10.210.11
STEP FIVE: Call is established between gateway and CUCM trunk – “Yay, we’re two dumb gateways talking to each other!”
May 12 15:17:12.397: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket
May 12 15:17:12.397: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket: fd=0 of type LISTENING has data
May 12 15:17:12.397: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket
May 12 15:17:12.397: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket: fd=2 of type ACCEPTED has data
May 12 15:17:12.397:  h323chan_chn_process_read_socket: h323chan accepted/connected fd=2
May 12 15:17:15.629: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket
May 12 15:17:15.629: h323chan_chn_process_read_socket: fd=2 of type ACCEPTED has data
May 12 15:17:15.629:  h323chan_chn_process_read_socket: h323chan accepted/connected fd=2
STEP SIX: DRQ received from CUCM trunk - “Can I be done talking to this gateway?
May 12 15:17:18.833:  RecvUDP_IPSockData  successfully rcvd message of length 272 from 10.10.210.11:32804
May 12 15:17:18.833: DRQ (seq# 3847) rcvd
STEP SEVEN: DCF sent to CUCM trunk- “Sure, you can disconnect the call now. I give you permission because I (gatekeeper) have the power.”
May 12 15:17:18.833:  IPSOCK_RAS_sendto:   msg length 3 from 10.10.110.1:1719 to 10.10.210.11: 32804
May 12 15:17:18.833:       RASLib::RASSendDCF: DCF (seq# 3847) sent to 10.10.210.11
STEP EIGHT: DRQ received from BR2 gateway - “Can I be done talking to this CUCM trunk?”
May 12 15:17:18.849:  RecvUDP_IPSockData  successfully rcvd message of length 108 from 10.10.112.2:50555
May 12 15:17:18.853: DRQ (seq# 1991) rcvdparse_rasusginfo_nonstd: Ras Usage Info Nonstd decode succeeded, remlen = 1221266776
STEP NINE: DCF sent to BR2 gateway – “Sure, you can disconnect the call now. I give you permission because I (gatekeeper) have the power.”
May 12 15:17:18.853:  IPSOCK_RAS_sendto:   msg length 3 from 10.10.110.1:1719 to 10.10.202.1: 50555
May 12 15:17:18.853:       RASLib::RASSendDCF: DCF (seq# 1991) sent to 10.10.202.1

Written by Matthew Berry

May 12th, 2010 at 10:00 am

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Gateway Registration Type: H323-GW or VOIP-GW

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The determining factor for whether a gateway registers with a TYPE of VOIP-GW or H323-GW relies entirely on the “allow-connections” commands entered under “voice service voip.” Essentially, if your gateway is functioning as an IP-to-IP gateway, it will display H323-GW.

The commands that make or break this:

voice service voip
allow-connections h t h
allow-connections h t s
allow-connections s t h
allow-connections s t s

After adding or removing these, make sure to bounce your gateway registration with the gatekeeper using “no gateway” and “gateway.”

I just verified this. Here is a snapshot without the commands listed above:

HQ-RTR#show gatekeeper endpoints
GATEKEEPER ENDPOINT REGISTRATION
================================
CallSignalAddr Port RASSignalAddr Port Zone Name Type Flags
————— —– ————— —– ——— —- —–
10.10.202.1 1720 10.10.202.1 58978 Spain VOIP-GW
H323-ID: BR2-RTR
Voice Capacity Max.= Avail.= Current.= 0

After adding the commands listed above:

HQ-RTR#show gatekeeper endpoints
GATEKEEPER ENDPOINT REGISTRATION
================================
CallSignalAddr Port RASSignalAddr Port Zone Name Type Flags
————— —– ————— —– ——— —- —–
10.10.202.1 1720 10.10.202.1 50555 Spain H323-GW
H323-ID: BR2-RTR
Voice Capacity Max.= Avail.= Current.= 0

Written by Matthew Berry

May 11th, 2010 at 6:57 pm

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Configuring RAS Retries and Timers

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I am reading in the Cisco IOS H.323 Configuration guide this morning.  Yes, it’s exhilarating to read at 5:00am (NOT!).  Since I’m nodding off to sleep, I am writing another post to pass on the next bit of knowledge – configuring RAS retries and timers.

Normally, you would never need to touch this piece of H.323 gateways, but we’re not dealing with “normal,” real-world experience.  We’re dealing with the psychotic CCIE voice lab.  You need to know everything.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Matthew Berry

February 11th, 2010 at 5:46 am

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Debug RAS Command

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Usage Guidelines

Use the debug ras command to display the types and addressing of RAS messages sent and received. The debug output lists the message type using mnemonics defined in International Telecommunications Union-Telecommunication (ITU-T) specification H.225.
Examples

Practical Example

In the following output, gateway GW13.cisco.com sends a RAS registration request (RRQ) message to gatekeeper GK15.cisco.com at IP address 10.9.53.15. GW13.cisco.com then receives a registration confirmation (RCF) message from the gatekeeper.

If there is no response, it could mean that the gatekeeper is offline or improperly addressed.

If you receive a reject (RRJ) message, it could mean that the gatekeeper is unable to handle another gateway or that the registration information is incorrect.

Router# debug ras
*Mar 13 19:53:34.231: RASlib::ras_sendto:msg length 105 from 10.9.53.13:8658 to 10.9.53.15:1719
*Mar 13 19:53:34.231: RASLib::RASSendRRQ:RRQ (seq# 36939) sent to 10.9.53.15
*Mar 13 19:53:34.247: RASLib::RASRecvData:successfully rcvd message of length 105 from 10.9.53.15:1719
*Mar 13 19:53:34.251: RASLib::RASRecvData:RCF (seq# 36939) rcvd from [10.9.53.15:1719] on sock [0x6168356C]

Written by Matthew Berry

February 11th, 2010 at 5:37 am

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